This summer, Chancey Williams will release the highly anticipated album, Rodeo Cold Beer, the commercial follow-up to his Billboard Heatseekers Charting album, Echo. The Wyoming native and his “Younger Brothers Band,” have relentlessly toured the Western United States, developing a rabid fan base not seen from the Cowboy State since Chris LeDoux. In fact, Chancey Williams and LeDoux are the only two people to ride in the Cheyenne Frontier Days Rodeo (one of the most famous in the world, the touted “Daddy of ‘Em All) and play its main stage as a major entertainer. The band has shared the stage with dozens of artists, including Lady Antebellum, Miranda Lambert, Eric Church, Craig Morgan, Rodney Atkins, Brantley Gilbert, Gary Allan, Trace Adkins, Billy Currington, Craig Campbell, Travis Tritt and Thompson Square. They’ve also enjoyed bills with Texas contemporaries Casey Donahew and Stoney LaRue. But, Williams says, nothing beats the opportunity to have occasionally been direct support for their heroes, legends like LeDoux, Alabama, Merle Haggard and Dwight Yoakam.

Chancey Williams was raised on a
 ranch near the small town of 
Moorcroft, Wyoming where his mom
 is a recently retired school teacher, 
his dad and brother ranch, and his
other brother is the head coach of a
notable high school wrestling
dynasty. The beautiful family ranch
is adjoined on one side by Keyhole
Lake, a regional tourist attraction.
“But we hardly knew it,” joked
Williams, “we really couldn’t afford a boat and my dad had us working all the time, anyway, so we hardly ever went over there!” It was a strong family background and work ethic that Chancey Williams credits with pretty much everything he has. Chancey and his father, Dennis, were both state champion wrestlers in High School, Chancey for two years in a row. He also followed his dad as a saddle bronc rider, going to the National High School Rodeo Finals, the College National Finals and even winning a couple of rounds at Cheyenne Frontier Days. While avidly supporting his musical dream, his parents also put great emphasis on education. In fact, Chancey Williams has a total of four degrees, including a Bachelor Degree in Political Science and a Master’s Degree in Public Administration from the University of Wyoming.

Chancey and his drummer, lifelong friend Travis DeWitt, started the Younger Brothers Band with the humble initial goal of entering a high school talent contest. The pair had no idea it would lead to wedding receptions, small fairs (then big fairs), small bars (then large clubs) and become a full-time career. In 2008 they were joined by the amazing harmonies and lead guitar of Wyatt Springsteen and then Brooke Latka with stunning fiddle and a 3rd part to their harmonies. More recently, Jack Robbins joined the band on bass.

The result is Chancey Williams and the Younger Brothers Band, a rowdy, raucous, unapologetic, memorable stage show that is on the road pretty much all the time. Somewhere along the way, playing for friends became playing for wild fans. The studio album Honky Tonk Road was released in 2008, Highway Junkie in 2011, and the Billboard Heatseeker Charting, Echo in 2013. Chancey Williams and the Younger Brothers have sold, between digital downloads and CD sales, more than 40,000 records, almost unheard- of for an independent artist without the aid of major distribution or a record label.

Now, for 2017, the band is set to release the new album and video for the title track, “Rodeo Cold Beer” and commence a big summer tour of the same name. Williams co-wrote much of the album with Nashville’s singer-songwriter, Trent Willmon. Willmon has songwriting credits with a variety of country artists, including Eric Church, Little Big Town, and Brad Paisley among others. “I love working with Chancey,” said Willmon, “he is the real deal. He knows how to entertain a crowd and has a great song sense, and he has that cowboy work ethic, respect, and good nature that is almost impossible to find these days.” The album was also produced by Grammy Award-winning and ACM nominated audio engineer, Mills Logan.

“We just love to play, travel, record our music and represent the great state of Wyoming,” said Williams, “It’s just in our blood, I can’t imagine doing anything else.”